The Level of Anxiety and Depression and the Relationship between them among the Students of the School of Educational Science at the University of Jordan

Authors

  • Omar Ismail Al-Orani Department of Counseling and Special Education, School of Educational Sciences. The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.35516/edu.v50i3.2385

Keywords:

Anxiety, depression, students of the school of Educational Sciences

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to identify the levels of depression and anxiety and the relationship between them among the students of the School of Educational Sciences at the University of Jordan.

Methods: This study used the descriptive correlational method. The study’s sample consisted of (305) male and female students enrolled in the School of Educational Sciences at the University of Jordan during the second semester of the academic year (2019/2020). To achieve its objectives, the study used Spell Berger Scale for Anxiety and Beck Depression Inventory after checking their psychometric properties. Results: The study found that 39% of students were not depressed, with the remaining 61% experiencing depression to varying degrees (slight: 22%, moderate: 19%, severe: 20%). On average, students had a moderate level of anxiety (2.41). The results revealed a positive correlation between anxiety and depression at high and low anxiety levels, but a negative correlation at moderate anxiety levels. Additionally, female students had higher levels of both anxiety and depression compared to males. Undergraduate students exhibited higher anxiety levels, while graduate students experienced more depression.

Conclusions: Since there is a positive relationship between anxiety and depression among students of the School of Educational Science at the University of Jordan when having a high level of anxiety, the study recommends the need to provide psychological counseling services to students.

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References

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Published

2023-10-22

How to Cite

Al-Orani, O. I. . (2023). The Level of Anxiety and Depression and the Relationship between them among the Students of the School of Educational Science at the University of Jordan. Dirasat: Educational Sciences, 50(3), 138–149. https://doi.org/10.35516/edu.v50i3.2385

Issue

Section

Articles
Received 2022-09-20
Accepted 2022-12-14
Published 2023-10-22